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Book Review: Lying in Wait by Liz Nugent

Lying in Wait by Liz Nugent
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟 (4 stars)
Publisher: Penguin UK

I bought this in paperback last year with a pile of other UK books and this has sat on in a bookcase ever since. I started seeing it pop up in bookworld and found it's to be released in the US in June, so I decided that it was long overdue for it to be more than a shelf sitter and finally cracked it open. I can't give up big spoilers (and just about every revelation unfurled in this story, feels like one!) but I can say that it was difficult to put down and that's the only reason it took me a day and a half to read it.

Book Review: The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories by Agatha Christie

The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories by Agatha Christie
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟 (3 stars)
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks

The Regatta Mystery is my first instance of reading about Parker Pyne. He may be more memorable a character in other stories but here he feels rather generic. It can't be easy to be compared to Poirot or Marple (or even Tommy and Tuppence Bereseford). Still, I liked Pyne and it was a solid mystery with a good solution. I also quite enjoyed his handling of a bit of a domestic issue in Problem at Pollensa Bay. I got to learn a bit more about Pyne as a person and he showed himself to be compassionate but not indulgent and I liked that. I don't know how many other works I'll come across Pyne but I look forward to it.

Book Review: Sparkling Cyanide (Colonel Race #4) by Agatha Christie

Sparkling Cyanide (Colonel Race #4) by Agatha Christie
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟 (4 stars)
Publisher: HarperCollins


In my further quest to read all the Christies, I picked up Sparkling Cyanide. As it happens this publication has a great cover so that pulled me in as well. The situation here is that Rosemary Barton is a year dead and her husband George is sure (after a series of letters) that she did not commit suicide as the inquest determined, but was murdered. He gathers together the people who were in attendance at her birthday dinner the night of her death to find the killer. It goes terribly and now it's up to Colonel Race to solve a murder (or two) and possibly a third if he's not quick about it.

Book Review: The Book of M by Peng Shepherd


The Book of M by Peng Shepherd
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟 (4 stars)
Publisher: William Morrow (June 2018)

The Book of M made me hope in the face of hopelessness, believe the unbelievable and in a most rare occurrence, make me grieve for all the main characters and pretty much all the secondaries. It was, all around, time well spent.

Book Review: A People's History of the Vampire Uprising by Raymond A. Villareal

A People's History of the Vampire Uprising by Raymond A. Villareal
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟 (3 stars)
Publisher: Mullholland Books (June 5)

This was like Villareal tossed a bit of Justin Cronin's The Passage and Trueblood/Sookie Stackhouse novels into a Vitamix and poured out this interesting concoction that's two parts social/religious/cultural/political satire and one part horror (make your own determination where the real horror lies for you).

Book Review: Death by Dumpling (A Noodle Shop Mystery #1) by Viven Chien

Death by Dumpling (A Noodle Shop Mystery #1) by Vivien Chien
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟  (4 stars)
Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks


This isn't just another cozy mystery with a plucky heroine with a food theme. This new series is told from the perspective of 27 year old, Asian American, Lana Lee. She's working at her parents' restaurant and a delivery order has gone awry and ended up with a dead customer. An investigation ensues and suspicion is cast about so Lana's got to figure this all out before anything worse happens.

Book Review: The High Season by Judy Blundell

The High Season by Judy Blundell
My rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟 (4 stars)
Publisher: Random House (May 22)

If I hadn't read it now, this is just the sort of read I'd be looking to take along when I head off to our beach destination in summer. I enjoy books about communities that are tony vacation or resort havens. My mother in law lives in one year round and used to live in an one adjacent that was likely sleepy some time before I was born but is rapidly building on seemingly every scrap of available grass and dune. It's remarkable to see a place change with the influx of new business and real estate opportunities. As some of The High Season characters point out throughout the book "Everything changes" and this book is to be commended on showing that well with the positives and negatives. I'm always interested in seeing how locales strike the balance of retaining the things that made it attractive to new residents and business without monetizing to the point that all the charm is lost that attracted people in the first place and the actual full time residents are priced out of living there in any season, not just the off.